John Mulford

Contents

 

  • Overview
  • Family members
  • Local Benefactor
  • Endorser of galvanic therapy for horses
  • Obituary
  • Origin of road name

His name is perpetuated in the local street name, Mulfords Hill. Mulfords Bridge. (601 616) while no longer a commonly used name, but the metal bridge still exists where the A340 road crosses Bishopswood Stream. Nowadays painted a grey camouflage colour, the bridge’s previously white-painted railings, were a landmark to locals.[2]

  • The Chapel Mortimer West End
  • Enclosure Document 1850
  • New Road Independent Chapel Basingstoke
  • The New Monthly Magazine 1st Feb 1814 Vol 1
  • Will
  • Countess of Huntingdon’s Connexion
  • Caroline Rodgers
  • Parish records
  • References

 

 

 

Overview

John Mulford [1 October 1720 –  7th January 1814] was a local benefactor and character. [1]  Most local people know of him because his name is perpetuated in a local street name, Mulford’s Hill. This street follows the A340 the path of the old  turnpike  (toll road) from  Aldermaston to Basingstoke, passing through the centre of Tadley. Mulford’s Hill  originally continued south passing over  Mulfords Bridge. (601 616). While this is no longer a commonly used name,  the metal bridge still exists where the A340 road crosses Bishopswood Stream. Nowadays painted a grey camouflage colour, the bridge’s previously white-painted railings, were a landmark to locals.[2]  to what is now Rowan Road and then turned left along the current path of Rowan Road.

 

In 1798 he  financed the building of a chapel in Mortimer West End on land provided by John Whitburn. The Bishop of Winchester licensed the premises for worship on 21 September of that year. By the 1820s, 300 people from as far as Thatcham, Bucklebury and Sherborne St John regularly attended services at the chapel. In 1826 the Reading Evangelical Society, which had been responsible for it, ceased to exist and the surviving trustees handed it over for a nominal sum to the trustees of the Countess of Huntingdon’s Connexion, whose property it remains today.

 

John Mulford was buried in the graveyard. His tombstone is in the graveyard of Mortimer West End Chapel.(see picture on page of 18 of tadley people and places) The epitaph on the stone reads “Gone to know more,adore more,love more; Christ is victorious. Satan vanquished. Here on earth take thy part of John Mulford. [1]

Ernie Kimber, writing in Tadley During My Time and Before, recounts how John Mulford claimed to be descended from one of William the Conqueror’s mole-catchers. On the day he died he was reported to have looked out the window and said, ‘this is a fine day for the gossips to go about and say “Old Mulford is dead”’. More details of his life and testimony can be found in Daniel

Benham’s book Some Account…, where his obituary from the Reading Mercury for 13 January 1814 is quoted. See dissenters.[2]

Family members[edit]

There is a John Mulford buried in St Stephen’s Burghurst in 1747. Today the St Stephen’s burial ground has many monuments although none are grand edifices; the earliest gravestone being one for John Mulford who died in 1747 but the first person in the recordof burials is John Greene who was interred in 1682..

In 1764 John Holland, a Cordwainer, had the house which was rented by Richard Cross a Husbandman. Later it was owned by George Woodward Grove and William Dicker, Yeoman, but then the ownership became complicated, for example, John Hyde of Hyde End paid the Poor Relief. Thomas Hyde of Causeway Farm and his nephew William purchased the house from Mr Mulford, Mr Arbery was the farmer. When Thomas died in 1804 it went to another nephew, Thomas, and Thomas Faulkner, but by 1810, the two brothers, Thomas Hyde of Foscott and William Hyde of Ibworth were the owners but it was farmed by Mr Hardy. In 1807 it was occupied by Joseph Hollandand owned by a group including Thomas Faulkner, Baughurst Yeoman; Thomas Hyde; William Hyde; Henry Sparsholt of Tadley; Jeremy & Samuel Bertram Esqs; John Mulford; John Blake and John Potter-Harris. When John Potter-Harris died in 1806 it was sold to John Butler.[3]

Where did he live in Tadley?[edit]

His will states: I give John GUNTER now living with me the copyhold estate I live in and occupy which I bought of John Daly [?PALY][4]

Local Benefactor[edit]

John Mulford provided the money to build two chapels. One, on the east side of Oat Street in Basingstoke, was registered on 27 February 1784 by John and Benjamin Loader with the remark ‘the present meeting house is inconvenient’. The second chapel, which still survives, is the Mortimer West End Chapel[1]

About 1778 a young turf cutter, converted at Tadley, started services in a cottage in Mortimer West In 1797 the services having been prepared, two of his Reading friends induced a minister in that town to come out to the parish. So large was the audience that the people flocked into a meadow, where services were subsequently held till the winter cold drove the people into the crowded cottage. At this juncture a wealthy old eccentric, John Mulford of Tadley. in 1798, erected the chapel on a piece of land given by the turf cutter. [5]

Endorser of galvanic therapy for horses[edit]

Ihe following letter to a news paper Mulford gave endorsement for Metallic Traitors, havin experimented with a galvanic remedy for humans which he had experimentally applied to horses:

JOHN MULFORD, Esq. of Tadley, near Basingstoke, Hants, January 19, 1802, communicated for publication to B. D. PERKINS, of Leicester-Square, London, the Patentee of the Metallic Traitors, the result of a number of experiments with them, which he says, ” have abundantly proved their very salutary effects on both the human and brute creation.” Besides several remarkable cures on the human subject, is the following on an animal:

Case: SPRAIN and CONTUSION on a Horse.”

A horse, which was plowing in a field full of springs and many deep cut drains, flipped his leg into one, and so damaged his knee, that he could not put his foot to the ground. The Tractors were applied, at which he evidently felt considerable effects, by his continually drawing up his leg as if to relieve himself and in 15 minutes he got his leg firm on the ground and stood upon it. On applying the Tractors afterwards, another singular effect was perceived,which has fo often been observed on the human human subject. The perspirable matter, as the Tractors were drawn over the parts affeded, so copiously flowed from under them, that it fell in drops on the ground. On carefully examining the knee, there was not the least crack apparent in the skin,fo that it must have flowed through the pores. The horse is now in health, and performing his daily work.” The Tractors, so necessary in every family, and among Horfes, may be had, genuine, with new and improved directions for using them, for Five Guineas the Set, of B. D. Perkins.. A. M. the Patentee, in the bode of the late John Hunter, Surgeon, Leicester-Square; and of Frederick Smith, Chemist and Druggist, in the Hay-Market, London. The portable nature of the Tractors renders their conveyance by Coach, or even by Post, perfectly convenient. Letters, including their amount (poit-paid) duly attended to. N. B . The purchasers of the Tractors receive gratis,two different books, which contain, as communicated by the first literary characters, about three thousand cures of Gout, Rheumatism,. Scalds, Headache, Toothache, Sprains, Inflammation etc. and all analogous Diseases of Horses. [6]

Obituary[edit]

THE LATE~ JOHN MULFORD ESQ. To: the Editor of the MORNING CHRONICLE, SIR Having seen a paragraph in your paper today, relating to the death and eccentricity of the late John Mulford Esq. allow me to encroach on your pages with another fact or two relating to that most valuable member of society , whose..death will be long regretted by the poor in the vicinity.where he resided and by-many others whose circumstances through above. povertv,, were greatly ameliorated by lis Ibetality. . Mr. Mulford did not die at Basingstoke as stated in your paper, but about six miles from that town at a place called Tadley, where .he had resided for many years; He was, interred in his. own Chapel yard, close to the remains Mr. Whit- burn, who was a protege of Mr. Mulford and a preacher to the poor of Mortimer, where his name is remembered with enthusiastic veneration.

Many public charities experienced his bounty; but in individual charities his humility always induced hi’n to conceal his :name from the object of his liberality. His dress was ertairtly.so mean as to excite pity in some per- sons whose hearts. were liberal beyond their pockets, and I .once knew .a man, in very. moderate circumstances, made.him. a present of a shilling, out of philanthropy to the forlorn appearance he cut on a. journey to Basing- stoke,. !Wither he.was going to. bestow a donation of one thousand pounds in one sumi. I saw him about three months since when his venerable beard swept his breast, and as he was a comely looking man his appeal excited in me feelings of respect beyond my power to describe.

It was his custom to give the poor of his parish an annual supply of faggots in the winter, and the expression- mentioned in your paper,. that the gossips would say he was dead without question, alluded to this cumistance, his liberality in the fuel way not having then been carried into execution. His mind was. stored with the truest philosophy arid it may be said with truth that no person ever spent an hour in his company (after he had retired from the gaieties of life) without an opportunity, to improve by it His having been King of the Gypsies, though currently reported amongst some of his connections was not recognized by himself; it therefore rests on dubious authority; but however this may have been, he had seen life in as much variety as any man of the day.

Though all I know of him would fill a moderate volume, the following anecdote which he related himself, shall close my present intention Going once with a party of gay sparks, to visit at a house of high respectability (at the time when large cuffs were worn) he slily conveyed a handful of grain’s, from a cart that was passing, into the cuff of one of the Gentlemen’s coats, who, on his arrival in the parlour raising his hand to his hat in order to make a very graceful bow to the lady of the house, discharged the said refuse of the brew house in all directions over the floor, to the no small amusement of the whole party. I am . A LATE INHABITANT OF TADLEY January 27th, 18I4. [7]

Origin of road name[edit]

Mulfords Hill, the main route through Tadley, also has an interesting history.

Mr John Mulford was a well-known character in the 1700s.

Born in October 1720, he was a wealthy man, although it is not actually known how he came by his wealth. He was very proud to have come from a traveller background and his relations were established in the Tadley area for many years. He sported a long white beard which nearly reached his knees and he dressed in the most expensive clothing of the day.

Although on a personal basis he was very frugal, being happy with just the essentials, he was very charitable to others, never rejecting anyone who needed financial help and generous to religious organisations after being influenced by the teachings of John Whitburn, a turf cutter.

He remained single all his life.

When asked about his ancestors he replied that they were ‘mole catchers to William the Conqueror’.

He was a fervent attendant of the local chapel and, during his lifetime, built two more, including accommodation for the ministers. One was built in 1798 at Mortimer Common and the other in Basingstoke.

John Mulford’s wish was that he would die suddenly which was realised when on January 7, 1814, he died in his chair at the age of 94. This in itself is not remarkable but for the fact that the same morning he had said to a friend ‘What a fine day for gossiping people to go about and say that old Mulford is dead’ He left £20,000 to be divided amongst his relatives and the church.

He now lies in the graveyard of his church at Mortimer Common, next to his mentor John Whitburn, with the epitaph ‘Gone to know more, adore more, love more; Christ Victorious, Satan Vanquished; Here earth take thy part of John Mulford’, and now over 200 years later, his name is remembered each time one travels through Tadley.[8]

The Chapel Mortimer West End[edit]

This church originates in the great evangelical revival of the late 18th century. In the 1770s, the locality around Mortimer – an expanse of heath and furze – was of a very wild character. About 1778, John Whitburn, a turf cutter, living in a cottage almost on the site of the present chapel, was converted under the preaching of the nearby Tadley minister, Mr [afterwards Dr.] Duncan. `Feeling a deep concern for the salvation of his perishing neighbours’, says an entry in the original church book, `he attempted to awaken them by argument, reading, and prayer.’ Whitburn held services in his own cottage on Sunday evenings and sometimes under the apple trees in his orchard and in other places around.

In 1797, two of his friends, who had joined the Baptist Church in Hosier’s Lane, Reading, persuaded their new pastor, the Rev. John Holloway, to come over and preach at Whitburn’s house. So large a number came that the cottage was too small to contain them, so that the service had to be held in an adjoining meadow. Mr Holloway, with the assistance of ministers from Reading, Basingstoke and elsewhere, continued the open air services throughout the summer. On the approach of winter, the congregation again met in the cottage, but the rooms were found inconveniently low and small.

At this juncture, Mr John Mulford, of Tadley, a wealthy and elderly bachelor, provided funds to help. With some contributions from Mortimer people [John Whitburn giving the land], Mulford erected the chapel in 1798. Several bricks bearing that date can still be seen above the window facing the road. On September 21st the chapel was licensed for worship by the Bishop of Winchester- a copy of the original certificate can be seen at the back of the church.

In June 1803, Mr Andrew Pinnell, a student who had just finished his course at Dr. Bogue’s Academy at Gosport, was engaged, and commenced his ministry at the chapel in August. One of his earliest duties was the interment of John Whitburn who died in December 1803. In his will, John left the chapel and surrounding five acres of land to be administered by Trustees `so as the Gospel may be faithfully preached’ there.

In 1805, it became necessary to enlarge the chapel to nearly twice its original dimensions and a manse cottage was added at about the same time. Chapel House, as it became known, provided much needed accommodation for the Pinnell family, with no fewer than nine children recorded in the baptismal register. On 30th May 1810, Andrew Pinnell was ordained to the Christian ministry at the chapel.

Although it had its ups and down, the chapel thrived through most of the 19th century: having been registered as a public place of worship, in accord with a general Act of Parliament, in 1860.

In 1905 the chapel was first registered for the solemnisation of marriages. However, after the First World War attendance and services at the chapel began to decline.

From the Second World War until 1960 church records were not kept except for a brief entry in 1956, dealing with correspondence with the Water Board and with arrangements for lighting the fires for heating the church on a Sunday.

In 1961 the chapel had a new heating system and an electricity supply. But, by 1963 the chapel was in desperate need of repair, and was closed for public worship in 1964 following receipt of an architect’s report that described the building as no longer safe. Services were moved to the School Room.

In 1972 the two cottages adjoining the chapel were repaired, and were inhabited throughout the 1970s. A serious damp problem was to re-occur after this; it being reported in 1983 that the manse cottage had been unoccupied for about eighteen months and the second cottage had also been vacated. Neither were considered fit to be lived in, and the premises continued to deteriorate throughout the rest of the decade.

The faithful few maintained their worship and witness throughout the 1980s. A feature of the summer months became a well attended open-air service. Membership, however, did not increase and in 1990 is given as 12 associate members – this taking account of the fact that some supported the chapel only as their second church, travelling from Reading or elsewhere to attend the afternoon service in the Schoolroom. An important development had been the listing of the chapel by the Department of the Environment in 1980 at the higher 2* grade; it was held to be `an outstanding example of a non-denominational building’. A planning application was made in 1984 to convert the chapel to residential use, prior to sale. This was refused because it would have caused excessive alteration to the structure and internal arrangement of the building, and the removal of fixtures and fittings which contributed to its architectural and historical interest.

In 1988, the Trustees attempted to sell the chapel, cottages and part of the landholding by tender through a Reading estate agent. This came to the attention of Basingstoke and Deane’s Planning Committee, which met on the 13th July. They recommended that the Trustees withdraw the current sale by tender, and consider alternative suggestions to restore the chapel, with which it was prepared to help. The required emergency work was carried out, although the full schedule of repairs were held in abeyance until plans were more advanced.

In the early 1990s another Connexional church, at nearby Goring on Thames, became more directly involved. The church at Goring had in the past given what support it could, occasionally supplying the pulpit and assisting with maintaining the graveyard areas. Work parties had come over, in the summer months, for a number of years. But now there was a new initiative; two young professional people, Dr. Max Rowe and his wife, Rosalind, felt a call to be involved in work of restoration of Mortimer West in both a spiritual and practical sense. In discussion with others, it seemed the first step should be to carry out a survey within the locality to see how spiritual needs were being met currently and whether there was still a need for a chapel with a strong evangelical witness at Mortimer West.

The resulting Development Study was completed by March 1991, and co-authored by Max Rowe and Mike Ward, also of the Goring church. On the basis of a survey of population, churches, youth activities, and other needs, within a radius of three miles or so, it was concluded there was considerable potential for the work of the chapel.

Two teams moved the work forward: the Coordinating Team, comprised of Goring and Mortimer members, with Brian Baldwin as Trustee; and the Building Team, comprised of Goring members, and Brian Baldwin, working with local planners and building conservation experts.

By the end of 1991 a partnership spirit was evident between the planners and building team, joined by Dr. Brenda Ward, a Goring member and historian at Reading University. This mutual cooperation led to joint work parties organised in November 1991 and January 1992 to clear the worst of the undergrowth surrounding the chapel and some of the interior rubble from collapsing plaster work and rotten wood flooring. By the end of 1992 a cost profile had been drawn up, plans produced, and tenders invited and returned, for the chapel work. The builders appointed in February 1993 were R. J. Smith and Co. of Whitchurch, and work on both chapel and cottages began the same month.

By August 1993 the chapel restoration was virtually finished, in time for the rededication service held on September 18th, 1993.

At the end of 1994 Allan Meakin and his family moved into the Manse; the chapel now had a settled pastor for the first time in over 100 years.

In 1998 the chapel celebrated the 200th anniversary of its founding.

This brief history has been condensed from an original history of the chapel, written in 1998 by Brenda Baldwin. This booklet is currently out of print

Enclosure Document 1850[edit]

(Formerly) Late Mulfords. Copyhold of inheritance under Mayor of Overton. Persons Interested Thomas Prior. Enclosure Document 1850 Page 47 Map B 509 – 514 Map A 707 – 708 / 715 [9]

New Road Independent Chapel Basingstoke[edit]

New Road Independent Chapel At the time of the 1851 Religious Census, there were two Independent Chapels in Basingstoke. One in London Street, had a long and illustrious history dating back to 1662, while the other in New Road had only opened in 1846. It would seem that New Road’s minister, Luke Longman Redgrove, was instrumental in securing its construction. The chapel is clearly shown on an Ordnance Survey map of 1871/3. The census recorded 82 worshippers (including 32 children) at the morning service and 52 at the evening.

Few traces of New Road Chapel have been found. 1851 census returns show Luke Redgrove as aged 56 and, not surprisingly, his occupation as that of ‘Independent Minister New Road Chapel’. At the time, he was living with his wife in Church Lane. He has not been found in either the 1861 or 1871 census returns. In those of 1881 his occupation is recorded as that of ‘Registrar of Births Deaths and Marriages (retired)’, by then he was living in Wote Street and his wife had died. Luke’s death occurred on 27 February 1884. According to a brief biography which appeared in the Hampshire Advertiser at the time he served as Basingstoke’s Registrar from 1862 to 1880. He then handed over this role to a friend on the grounds that ill-health meant that he would be unable to cope with the increased responsibilities arising from the 1881 census. Although he is described as ‘one of the oldest and most respected’ of Basingstoke’s inhabitants no mention is made of his time as New Road’s minister. As recorded, ‘he left no family.’

The Chapel is not shown on the 1893/5 Ordnance Survey map so it probably closed in the 1880s. Various questions concerning the Chapel arise. Why was it felt necessary to have a second Independent Chapel in Basingstoke? What was the nature of the relationship (if any) between New Road Independent Chapel and London Street Independent Chapel? Did Redgrove continue as minister after 1862 when he was appointed Registrar? Was anyone other than Redgrove minister at the Chapel? Have any further records of Redgrove or the Chapel survived?

Roger Ottewill January 2017 [10]

The New Monthly Magazine 1st Feb 1814 Vol 1[edit]

At Tadley, John Mulford, csq.95. This gentleman’s extended life has been re markable for several eccentricities. In his early days he associated for some time with the gipsy tribe. When his conduct assumed a more sober complexion, he resided in different places as a respectable gentleman, attracting notice by the peculiarity and even splendour of his dress. He afterwards professed an attention to the duties of a religious life; and being possessed of considerable property, he devoted a portion of it to religious purposes. He built two chapels, with dwelling-houses for the ministers, at his own expense. His generous disposition attracted the notice and frequent visits of the friends and patrons of public institutions and charitable societies, who seldom waited on Mr. Mulford with their cases in vain. His own expenditure, however, in his kitchen, parlour, and wardrobe,was of the most frugal kind, though he was always neat in his person and dress. His manner of life was somewhat in the hermit style. It need scarcely be said, that he never entered into the matrimonial state.

He was considered as a man of intellectual ability, and well acquainted with the concerns of life. It is certain, he had seen life’s varieties more than most men, having made so many experiments to find out its summum bonum. As to his family and its antiquity, Mr. Mulford once said, “My arms are three moles and three mole-hills, and my great ancestor was mole-catcher to William the Conqueror.” About a year before his death, he found out that beards were never designed to fall beneath the tonsor’s razor, and therefore his own chin was indulged with the venerable luxury of a very big beard, which completed the costume of the patriarch. It was his wish for many years to leave the world suddenly, if it pleased God, that he might not occasion much trouble to any attendants. In this respect is wish was granted. He died in his chair in his parlour, across which he had walked several times, without pain. A few hours before his departure, having looked out of the window, he observed, what a fine day it was for gossiping people to go about and say, “Old Mulford is dead!” It is said he has left behind him about 20,000l., a considerable part of which is bequeathed to some poor relations, nor has he forgotten the two chapels which he created. While his death is gain to several, it will be a loss to many more,who will miss his frequent acts of benevolence, particularly the poor in his own neighbourhood. [11]

Will[edit]

                             Original by Sylvia Wood 
  • I John Mulford of Basingstoke, Gentleman, make this my will and dispose of what pleases God to bless me with as follows; and as I sit in the faith of the Lord Jesus Christ my God and Saviour, leave this my Faith on —— that the Mercy of God, the giver, may be Glorified.
  • I give my cousins Jeremy? and Samuel Boatham? One thousand pounds each. I give Oldham Oldham? or other Trustees for the time being of the late Lady Huntingdon’s Connection of promoting and supporting the Gospel, one hundred pounds to further her good designs.
  • I give John Wilson and —— West Trustees or the Trustees for the time being of the late Reverend George Whitfields Tabernacles in Moorfields or elsewhere? one hundred pounds to carry on his pious designs.
  • I give Henry? Thirton? treasurer or the Trustees for the time being of the Missionary Society one hundred pounds to carry on that good design.
  • I give Joseph ——- and Thomas Smith Trustees or the Trustees for the time being of the Religious Trust? Society, one hundred pounds to support that good design
  • I give Samuel —— Treasurer or the Trustees for the time being of the ———- Society, one hundred pounds to carryon their useful and Christian designs.
  • I give Henry Thornton Treasurer or the Trustees for the time being of the British and Foreign Bible Society, one hundred pounds to carry on that most commendable design.
  • All these Societies are founded in London
  • The Seven Thousand pounds New South Sea Annuity Stock I have standing in my Name I give to my cousin John ——– and George Frederick —- his Brother in Law their Executors? and —— on trust to ——– pay the interest thereof as it becomes due sell and dispose part or whole of the said stock as hereafter directed that (Page 2) is to pay Lucy wife of Thomas Thorngate of Baughurst? Mary wife of James Carter ——– Benjamin ——— of Tadley? Twenty pounds a year each during their respective lives and to pay John Stroud Farmer at Aldermaston Thirty pounds a year
  • during his life the remainder interest? to lay out for support maintenance of Ann wife of George Sale? so long as she continues separate and not suitably provided for by her husband.
  • I direct that my Executors do provide a suitable family for her to lodge and board with they paying for the same not exceeding fifty pounds a year and to supply her with proper plain clothing and perfect living? all as they shall think proper and when either of the Annuitants die, his her or their annuity shall go to the survivors and if but one —- the —– to that one during his or her life and when all the Annuitants are dead I direct the stock to be sold and the — money provided to be equally divided among the children as I have appointed.
  • The residue of my Effects and Estate to be paid to the fifty pounds a year I have in the Government —- Annuity I give to Thomas King Surgeon in Reading and —– Workman? Surgeon in Basingstoke their Executors and admins? in trust to pay the officiating Minister at the Chapel and house l built on Mortimer late Common as appointed by the owner thereof after the rate of Thirty pounds a year for the time he officiates but this stipend is given only on the condition that there are two sermons preached on a Sunday in the daytime in the said Chapel.
  • The remaining Twenty pounds I give to the Minister given to the above Chapel built on Mortimer late common
  • I give my cousin John ——– one hundred pounds. I give his children Martha Margaret Pricilla George Isabel? Fifty pounds, each give Harriet Martha Jane? Margaret Lucy? Geofge? children of my cousin Martha ——- Ninety? pounds each, give Margaret Thomas John Sophia four children of the late William Lovell Thirty pounds each, give Mary Pyle widow at Overton and the widow corps? at Overton one hundred pounds each. I give Lancelot? Susannah Jane Elizabeth Ann five children of my late cousin George Simpson Fifty pounds each.
  • I give Sophia daughter of the late Edward Coot one hundred pounds, give Thomas Carter of Fishmonger Alley Four hundred pound. I give his children Thomas Mary? Harriet Robert Mulford? Ánn Fifty pounds each, give James his brother a Bookbinder one hundred pounds.
  • I give Ann Fairman and her sister Charlotte Warner? Twenty pounds each I give Ann Scott? of Overton and her heirs for ever the house and land I bought of her mother ——– at Overton
  • I give to Stephen James her Brothers Twenty pounds each
  • I give to Thomas Drew? Joseph ———— late Minister of my Chapel in Basingstoke Charles Heath? of Embourne? Farmer William ——– my Carpenter Thomas Other? of Basingstoke Labourer Joseph Wild my late Servant The Reverend Charles John Coleman? Lydia Daniel David James Elizabeth Ann Six children of the late John Whitburn David Hunter? his Grandson one hundred each
  • I give John Hunter? now living with me the Copyhold Estate I live in ——–which I bought of John Daly? with all the Fixtures (Page 3) Locks Bars Bolts —— and Beddings? therein I give William ——— the labourer for me Fifty pounds/I give Benjamin ——– during his life the bargain I bought of him and he now lives in.
  • I give Joseph West? the Estate I bought of him during his life-at his death direct it to be sold with the Timber thereon and, one hundred pounds of it to be equally divided among his children
  • I give John Chandler for his life the house and garden he rents of me at his death I give it with the Meadow adjoining it to his son David and his heirs for ever (provided he and his family live in it and occupy it) which I bought of Thomas Elliot givę John Stroud Labourer to John Stroud Twenty pounds give David David Thatcher of Shinfield John Sherman? my painter David —-of Aldermaston Brickmaker? John —— my Thatcher James Wild? of Wasing Steward to Mr Mount? Joseph Wild son of the above Joseph Wild Fifty pounds each, give John Chandler my Tenant John ——, The Rev Samuel Brown of Tadley, John ——, two Friends of the above Ann —— Twenty pounds each.
  • I give Andrew Piverill? Minister of the Chapel I built on Mortimer late Common Five hundred pounds, give the poor one hundred pounds that attend the Ministry there and for whom to be distributed by him without delay not to those kept by their parishes or prisons of indifferent or bad Character, give Fifty pounds to the poor of Basingstoke that attend the Chapel I there built to be distributed by Mr Workman? –ding the lease caution?
  • I give my Gold watch Seals —- Chain — to the above ——– ——–/give her Father George Frederick ——- of Coots? Court London and Workman? of Basingstoke Five hundred pounds each and hereby appoint them Executors of this my will hereby revoking all ormer wills made by me declaring this my last will all written? by me in my Seventy?(ninety?) third year in witness thereof I have
  • hereto set my Grand seal this Twenty first day of May in the year of our Lord One thousand Eight hundred and Thirteen give to Alice James? and her two sons Silas? Twenty pounds each.
  • No Legatees to this my will above the sum of Four hundred pounds shall have any right to claim —— or ——– the same but upon giving receipt? for the same and in full? of all ——-
  • All the rest of my Effects and Estate I direct to be sold and the money thereof to be Equally divided between them ten children of the above Martha and George Frederick John —— Tho Carter? the late George Simpson I give the above John ——– the Grindstone Garden Tools Ladders Wedges in the Yard and Outhouses
  • John Mulford Signed sealed published and declared by the Testator
  • John Mulford as his last will who in his presence and in the presence of each other and at his request have put our names as witnesses hereto Daniel Prior / David Prior / Isaac? Prior Farmers of their own properties at Taddy??
  • In the prerogative court of Canterbury 22nd Jan 1814 Appeared pesonally George Frederick -COOZof Coots Court Carey Street Lincolns Inn Fields Gentleman (page 4) Gilbert Burn? of Great —- Street Goodmans Fields in the County of Middlesex Gentleman and Joseph Robins of Domingo Street Old Street in the parish of Saint —– Old Street in the same County Gentleman and made Oath as follows
  • First the said George Frederick — for himself made Oath that he is one of the Executors named in the last will and Testament of John Mulford of Basingstoke in the County of Southampton deceased that being at the house of the said deceased on the Tenth day of January instant and agreeably to what the said Deceased in his life time told him proceeded to look for the said deceased’s will when he in company with Mr ———- Workman in a secret drawer in a writing desk in the deceased’s parlour found the last will and Testament written on parchment
  • and the said Gilbert Burn and Joseph Robins for themselves made Oath that they knew and were well aquainted with the said John Mulford deceased for several years before and at the time of his death and having frequently seen him write are thereby become well aquainted with his manner and Character and of handwriting and having now lawfully viewed and perused the several words appearing to be written upon Erazures also the several introductions? in the said last will and Testament of the said deceased? now hereunto ammended? to wit the words one thousand written upon an Erazure upon the third line from the top of the said will also the word Out written upon Erazures upon the fourth fifth sixth seventh and eighth lines from the top of the said will also the introduction of the words one hundred pounds between the eighth and ninth lines from the top of the said will,
  • the introduction? of the name and words Benjamin ——– of Tadley between the eleventh and twelfth lines of the said will also the word thirty appearing to be written upon an Erazure upon the twelfth line of the said will the introduction of the words and when all the annuitants are dead direct the stock to be sold and the —- money provided to be equally divided among the Children as I have appointed the residue of my Effects and Estate to be paid to between the fifteenth and sixteenth lines from the top of the said will the introduction? of the words ——– or other unavoidable? accidents/ excepted? And that no ——— ——— or any contrary to the ——– of the Church of England be ——– to be preached or nominated? in the said Chapel between the eighteenth and nineteenth lines from the top of the said will the introduction of the words at Basingstoke in my Chapel between the nineteenth and twentieth lines from the top of the said will the introduction of the Name John after the word cozen? between the said Nineteenth and Twentieth lines the words only on this condition that there appearing to be written upon an Erazure upon the eighteenth line of the said will the words that Labours for me Fifty pounds also appearing written upon an Erazure upon the twenty ninth line of the said will the words one hundred pounds appearing to be written upon an Erazure upon the Thirty first line also the introduction of the words of it over the said words pounds the introduction of the words provided he and (page 5) his family live in it and occupy it between the Thirty first and Thirty second lines from the top of the said will the introduction of the words Brickmaker between the Thirty second and Thirty third lines of the said will and the words Labourer to Twenty pounds appearing written upon Erazures upon the said Thirty third line of the said will the names and words James Admans? of Wasing Steward to Mr Mount? written upon an Erazure upon the Thirty fourth line and the introduction of the words The Rev Samuel Brown of Tadley above the Thirty fourth line of the said will the introduction? of the words I give the poor One hundred pounds that Attend between the thirty fifth and thirty sixth lines and the words five hundred pounds written upon an Erazure upon the said Thirty fifth line of the said will the word Alice and her two sons Silas Twenty pounds written upon an Erazure upon the fourth line from the bottom of the said will and the name James and the word each written over the same the words No Legatee in this my will above the sum of Four hundred appearing written upon an Erazure upon the third line from the bottom of the said will
  • they the — do verily? and in their – believe the whole of the said introductions? and words written upon the several Erazures before particularly —— to be all of the proper handwriting of him the said John Mulford ——– and the said George Frederick ——— for himself further that now carefully viewing and perusing all the said several introductions and words written upon Erazures before particularly described also the obliteration of that part of the twenty? ninth line from the word poundsto the words I give as the next line also the obliteration from? the word the to the word grind stones in the last line of the said will he saith that he observed? all the said several introductions? obliterations and words written upon Erazures as aforesaid when he first found and perused the said will and that the said will is now in every aspect in the very same plight and condition as when he so found the same GF ——- Gilbert Burn Joseph Robins James? Day? the said George Frederick —- Gilbert Burn and Joseph Robins were duly sworn to the of this affidavit before me S Parson? surrogate P Geo Silk? Notary Public
  • Proved at London 26th January 1814 before the Judge by the oaths of George Frederick —— and —- Workman the Executors to whom admin was granted having been first sworn by Commission duly to administer
  • Proved at London 26th April 1815 before the Judge by the Oaths of George Frederick ——-and ——Workman the Executors to whom admin was granted having been first sworn duly to administer by commission the probate of the will of the deceased granted in the month of January 1814 to the said Executors under the sum of Twenty thousand pounds having been first brought in voluntarily and declared Null and void as by the acts of court appear
  • [I have the word introduction? several times on the last 2 pages which I’m not happy with. I think how it could be interlineation as interline is Xo write between the lines of a test. Have also come up with the surname Herbert for George Frederick but am not too sure]

Bold text===Stephen Giles Transcript of the Will)===

John Mulford’s Will of 1813

I John Mulford of Basingstoke Gentleman make this my will and disperse what pleased God to bless me with as follows and as I die in the faith of the Lord Jesus Christ my God and Saviour leave this my faith on record that the mercy of God the Giver may be glorified. I give my cousins Jeremy and Samuel Bentham [1] £1,000 each and I give ….. ….. or other trustees for the time being of the late Lady Huntingdon’s pious design of promoting and supporting the Gospel £100 to further her good designs. [2] I give John Wilson and … West trustees or the trustees for the time being of the late Reverend George Whitfields Tabernacles in Moorfields or wherever £100 to carry on his pious designs.[3] I give Henry Thornton treasurer of the trustees or the trustees for the time being of the Missionary Society £100 to carry on that good design.[4] I give Joseph T… and Thomas Smith trustees or other trustees for the time being of the Hibernian Society £100 to carry on the needful and Christian design.

I give to Henry Thornton treasurer or the trustees for the time being of the British and Foreign Bible Society £100 to carry on that most commendable design. All these societies are formed in London. The £7,000 New South Sea Annuity stock I have standing in my name I give to my cousin John Howes and George Frederick Herbst [5] his brother-in-law their executor administrators in trust to receive and pay the interest thereof as it becomes due sell and dispose part or whole of the said stock as hereafter directed that is to pay Lucy wife of Thomas Thorngate of Pranghurst? Mary wife of James Carter bookbinder Benjamin Justice of Sudley £20 a year each during their respective lives and to pay John Stroud farmer at Aldermaston £30 a year during his life the remainder in trust for support maintenance of Ann wife of George Lake so long as she continues separate and not suitably provided for by her husband. I direct that my executors do provide a suitable family for her to lodge and board with they paying for the same not exceeding £50 a year and to supply her with proper plain clothing and pack or money all as they shall think proper and when either of the annuitants die his her or their annuity shall go to the survivors and if but one then the ….. to that one during his or her life and when all the annuitants are dead I direct the stock to be sold and the money produced to be equally divided among the children as I have appointed the residue of my effects and estate to be paid to. The £50 a year I have in government long annuity I give to Thomas Ring surgeon in Reading and Maurice Workman surgeon in Basingstoke their executors and administrators in trust to pay the officiating minister at the chapel and house I built on Mortimer late Common as appointed by the owners thereof after the rate of £30 a year for the time he officiates but this stipend is given solely on this condition that there are two sermons preached on a Sunday in the day time in the said chapel sickness or other unavoidable accident excepted and that no heretical doctrine or any contrary to the Articles of the Church of England to be suffered to be preached or insinuated in the said chapel. The remaining £20 I give to the minister officiating at Basingstoke in my chapel subject to and on the same conditions as that given to the above chapel built on Mortimer late Common. I give to my cousin John Howes £100. I give to his children Margaret, Martha, Petronella, George Herbst £50 each. I give Harriet, Martha, Jane, Margaret Lucy, Georgina children of my cousin Martha Herbst £90 each.[6] I give Margaret, Thomas, John, Sophia children of the late William Lovell £30 each. I give Mary Pyle widow at Overton and the widow T…. of Overton £100 each. I give Lancelot, Susannah, Jane, Elizabeth, Ann five children of my late cousin George Simpson £50 each. I give Sophia daughter of the late Edward Cook £100.[7] I give Thomas Carter of Fishmonger Alley £400. I give his children Thomas, Mary, Harriet, Robert Mulford, Ann £50 each.[8] I give James his brother a bookbinder £100. I give Ann Fairman and her sister Charlotte Warne £20 each. I give Ann Lott of Overton and her heirs forever the house and land I bought of her mother … at Overton. I give to Stephen, James her brothers £20 each. I give Thomas Drew, Joseph Hinxman late minister at my chapel in Basingstoke Charles Heath of Embourn farmer William Cotteret my carpenter Thomas Other of Basingstoke labourer Joseph Wild my late servant the Reverend Charles John Coleman [9], Lydia, Daniel, David, James, Elizabeth, Ann six children of the late John Whitburn David Gunter his grandson £100 each. I give John Gunter now living with me the copyhold estate I live in and occupy which I bought of John Daly with all the fixtures locks bars bolts bells bods and borddings? therein. I give William Hasker the labourer for me £50 I give Benjamin Justice during his life the bargain I bought of him and he now lives in. I give Joseph West the estate I bought of him during his life. At his death I direct it to be sold with the timber thereon and £100 of it to be equally divided among his children. I give John Chandler for his life the house and garden he rents of me. At his death I give it to his son David and his heirs for ever provided he and his family live in it and occupy it which I bought of Thomas Elliott. I give John Stroud labourer to John Stroud £20. I give David David thatcher at Shirfield (Sherfield) John Stillman my painter David Driker of Aldermaston brickmaker John Hunt my thatcher James Adams of Waring steward to Mr Mount Joseph Wild son of the above Joseph Wild £50 each. I give John Chandler my tenant John Mi…? the Reverend Samuel Brown of Tadley John … S…? two friends of the above Ann Lake £20 each. I give Andrew Pinell minister at the chapel on Mortimer late Common £500.[10] I give the poor £100 that attend the ministry there and elsewhere to be distributed by him without delay not to be those kept by their parishes or prisons of indifferent or bad characters. I give £50 to the poor of Basingstoke that attend the chapel I there built to be distributed by Mr Workman recommending the above caution. I give my gold watch seals stool chair et to the above Harriet Herbst. I give her father George Frederick Herbst of Cooks Court London and Maurice Workman of Basingstoke £500 each and hereby appoint them executors of this my will hereby revoking all former wills made by me declaring this my last will and all wrote by me in my ninety third year. In witness thereof I leave hereto set my hand and seal this twenty first day of May in the year of our Lord 1813. I give Alice James and her two sons Silas £20 each. No legatees to this my will above the sum of £400 shall have any right to claim demand or receive the same but upon giving receipt for the same and in full of all demands. All the list of my effects and estate I direct to be owed and the money thereof to be equally divided between the children of the above Martha and George Frederick Herbst, John Howes, Thomas Carter the late George Simpson. I give the above John Gunter the grindstone garden tools ladders wedges in the ground and outhouses. John Mulford signed sealed published and declared by the testator John Mulford as his last will who in his presence and in the presence of each other and at his request have put our various witnesses hereto Daniel Prior David Prior Isaac Prior famers of their own properties at Tadley?

In the Prerogative Court of Canterbury 22nd January 1814 appeared personally George Frederick Herbst of Cooks Court, Carey Street, Lincolns Inn Fields gentleman, Gilbert Burn of Great Alie St, Goodmans Fields in the county of Middlesex gentleman [11] and Joseph Robins of Domingo St in the parish of St Luke in the same county, gentleman and made oath as follows. First the said George Frederick Herbst for himself made oath that he is one of the executors named in the last will and testament of John Mulford late of Basingstoke in the county of Southampton deceased that being at the house of the said deceased on the 10th day of January instant and agreeably to what the said deceased in his lifetime told him proceeded to look for his the said deceased will when he in company with Mr Maurice Workman in a secret drawer in a writing desk in the deceaseds parlour found the last will and testament written on parchment and the said Gilbert Burn and Joseph Robins for themselves made oath that they know and were well acquainted with the said John Mulford deceased for several years before and at the time of his death and having frequently seen him write are thereby because well acquainted with his manner and character of handwriting and having now carefully viewed and perused the several words appearing to be written upon erazures also the several interlineations in the said secret now hereunto …. To wit the words one thousand written upon an erasure upon the third line from the top of the said will also the word one written upon erazure upon the fourth fifth sixth seventh and eighth lines from the top of the said will. Also the interlineation of the words one hundred pounds between the eighth and ninth lines from the top of the said will the interlineation of the name and words Benjamin Justice of Tadley between the eleventh and twelfth lines of the said will Also the word thirty appearing to be written upon an erasure upon the twelfth line of the said will the interlineation of the words and when all the annuitants are dead desire the stock to be sold and the … money produced to be equally divided among the children as I have appointed the residue of my effects and estate to be paid to between the fifteenth and sixteenth lines from the top of the said will the interlineation of the words at Basingstoke in my chapel between the nineteenth and twentieth lines from the top of the said will the interlineation of the name John after the word cozen between the said nineteenth and twentieth lines the words solely on this conditions that there appear to be written upon an erasure upon the eighteenth line of the said will the words that labours for me fifty pounds also it appearing written upon an erasure upon the twenty ninth line of the said will the words one hundred pounds appear to be written upon an erasure upon the thirty first line also the interlineation of the words it over the said words pounds the interlineation of the words provided he and his family live in it and occupy it between the thirty first and thirty second lines from the top of the said will the interlineation of the words brickmaker between the thirty second and thirty third lines of the said will and the words labourer to twenty pounds as appearing written upon erazures upon the said thirty third line of the said will the names and words James Adams of Waring steward to Mr Mount written upon an erasure upon the thirty fourth line and the interlineation of the words the Robert Samuel Brown of Tadley above the thirty fourth line of the said will the interlineation of the words I give the poor one hundred pounds that attend between the thirty fifth and thirty sixth lines and the words and the words five hundred pounds written upon an erasure upon the said thirty fifth line of the said will the word alive and her … … as twenty pounds written upon an erasure upon the fourth line from the bottom of the said will and the name James and word each written over the same the words No legatee in this my will above the sum of four hundred appearing written upon an erasure upon the third line from the bottom of the said will they the deponents do verily and in their consciences believe the whole of the said interlineations and words written upon the several erazures before particularly set forth to be all of the proper handwriting of his the said John Mulford deceased and the said George Frederick Herbst for himself further saith that now carefully viewing and perusing the said interlineations and words written upon erazures before particularly described also the obliteration of that part of the twenty ninth line from the word pounds to the words I give in the next line also the obliteration from the word the to the word grindstones in the last line of the said will he saith that he observed all the said several interlineations obliterations and words written upon erazures as aforesaid where he first found and perused the said will and that the said will is now in every respect in the very same plight and condition as when he so found the same. Gilbert Burn Joseph Robins James Day the said George Frederick Herbst Gilbert Burn and Joseph Robins were duly sworn to the truth of this affidavit before me parson surrogate priest Geo Silf Notary public. Proved at London 26th January 1814 before the judge by the oath of George Frederick Herbst and Maurice Workman the executors to whom … was sworn by commission duly to administer. Proved at London 26th April 1815 before the judge by the oaths of George Frederick Herbst and Maurice Workman the executors to whom .. was granted having been first sworn duly to administer by commission the probate of the will of the deceased granted in the month of January 1814 to the said executors under the sum of £20,000 having been first brought in voluntarily and declared null and void as by the acts of court appear. [1] Jeremy Bentham was a noted philosopher and social reformer and cousin of John Mulford. Bentham made a will at the age of 21 in which he left a gold ring to John Mulford. However, Bentham was to outlive Mulford by 18 years. http://pombo.free.fr/bentham1769.pdf page 135. Bentham was a correspondent of John Mulford. Samuel Bentham was brother of Jeremy and an engineer and naval architect. [2] Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, prominent leader in the evangelical revival of the late 18th century and founder of 64 chapels in England and Wales. [3] George Whitfield or Whitefield was a correspondent of Countess of Huntingdon and preacher of the evangelical revival and an early leader of Methodism. He had died in 1770. [4] Henry Thornton was an economist and MP for Southwark, member of the Clapham Sect, an evangelical branch of the Church of England. He was an associate of William Wilberforce in his campaign against slavery. [5] John Howes was an artist, one of the first students of the Royal Academy in 1770. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Howes_(painter) George Frederick Herbst was a jeweller who had married Martha Howes, John’s brother in 1775. [6] More details on the Howes family can be found here: https://howesfamilies.com/getperson.php?personID=I46758&tree=Onename In fact Martha and George Frederick Herbst actually had six daughters. I have added commas to the list as Margaret Lucy is one person, but sister Elizabeth is missing. [7] It is not clear how John Howes and Martha Howes were related to John Mulford, nor George Simpson, all apparently cousins of John Mulford. The father of John and Martha Howes was William Howes, a clockmaker, and Master of the Company of Clockmakers in 1777. William Howes was apprenticed to John Mulford senior, father of John Mulford, in 1721. https://howesfamilies.com/getperson.php?personID=I121051&tree= Onename John Mulford was apprenticed to his father in 1736. Sophia Cook was almost certainly the niece of John Howes. Her father was Edward Cook who was married to Elizabeth Howes, elder half sister of John and Martha Howes. [8] A Robert Mulford Carter was baptised at St Saviour, Southwark on 9 October 1791, now Southwark Cathedral. As Fishmonger Alley, given as his father’s residence was close by in Southwark, this seems very likely to be the same person. [9] Probably rector of Winterbourne Gunner, Wiltshire. [10] https://www.mortimervillage.org.uk/sites/mvpprelaunch.i-ntarsia.com/files/MTTA/Other_churches_and_chapels.pdf [11] Gilbert Burn’s death announced in the Gentleman’s Magazine in 1821: https://www.google.co.uk/books/edition/The_Gentleman_s_Magazine_Or_Monthly_Inte/LbIUAAAAQAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=gilbert+burn+1821+gentleman%27s+magazine&pg=PA93&printsec=frontcover Gilbert Burn was also named in the will of William Howes as in [7] above. The will can be seen in the link there. Notes I have added punctuation to the above for clarity, for example full stops at the end of sentences. It seems to me that ‘I give’ usually represents the beginning of a sentence. I have added commas to lists of names for clarity, for example, where I know the names of ‘children’ such as the children of George Frederick Herbst and John Howes. It was useful to confirm that Margaret Lucy is one person, not two. I have used numbers in the will, such as £100 rather than one hundred pounds, as it was written. Deciphering the script is difficult particularly names so I have either left blanks …. or made a guess with a ? at the end. This is by no means a completed and fully edited piece of work. Stephen Giles sdgiles39@yahoo.co.uk 18th January 2021

Countess of Huntingdon’s Connexion[edit]

During the reign of Philip and Mary (1536-7) the Guild of the Holy Ghost held “Frymles” or the “Hollie Goste Ferme” which is now the “Old Down” adjoining the Down Grange Estate , and among their possessions was a “Horse Mill” to grind malt, lying in Wote Street”. The site is now occupied by Mr. B. C. Jukes’s premises. One would like to identify the site of the old ” Holy Ghost Barn,” which stood somewhere between Church Street and Wote Street, in 1578. Adjoining is the Church and Manse of the Countess of Huntingdon’s Connexion, whose first place of worship, in 1755, was in Church Street. A barn originally stood in the site, and this was used as a theatre, not as an early pastor said, “for the edification of Christians, but to gratify the taste of the worldling.” The old theatre was pulled down and a church erected in (1775). The site had been purchased by Mr. John Mulford and Mr. Benjamin Loader, and was conveyed to trustees. Twenty-seven years later (in 1802) the Church was rebuilt, and the Manse erected by Mr. John Mulford. This Mr. Mulford was connected with Tadley and of a somewhat eccentric character. It is said that in his early days he associated himself with gipsies, but later became a respectable gentleman, attracting notice by the richness and peculiarity of his dress.

His name whimsically suggested to him that his ancestor was mole-catcher to William the Conqueror, and his arms were three Moles and three molehills. He built and endowed two places of worship, one at Basingstoke, the other at Mortimer Common, and at the latter he was buried in February 1814, where an inscribed tombstone preserves his memory. [12]

Caroline Rodgers[edit]

DRAFT: John MULFORD’s [1720 – 1814] family:

Rev William WOODWARD John MULFORD Rector of Baughurst 1668 – 1703 m 15/11/1690 London [presumed] l Patience HILTON l l l l l l Alice/Alicia WOODWARD John MULFORD bap 22/8/1687 Baughurst b m m 3/1/1716 Holborn Thomas GROVE [NA will] Ann WOODWARD l bap 26/8/1682 Baughurst l daughter of Rev William WOODWARD l l l l l l Alicia GROVE John MULFORD m [1] Richard WHITEHORN b 1/10/1720 [only issue] m [2] Jeremiah BENTHAM dsp 7/1/1814 Tadley l l l Jeremiah BENTHAM and Samuel BENTHAM [ref line 6 of John Mulford’s 1814 will]

v

John MULFORD’s [1720 – 1814] other “cousins” mentioned in his will:

John, and Martha HOWES m George Frederick HERBST [jeweller] Late George SIMPSON

John and Martha Howes’ father William HOWES and George SIMPSON were both of the London Clockmaker’s Company as were John MULFORD b 1720 and his father.

I have not found any genealogical connection but note:

http://www.clockmakers.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/CCMASTERSFINAL-amended-

Clockmakers’ Company Masters and their Apprentices. Transcribed from Atkins’ list of 1931. Master. Trade/Co. Apprentice. Bound. Freed.

Possible examples of the Mulfords’ ware can be Googled.

A JOHN MULFORD (1716-1726) OR JOHN MULFORD SON (1748-1750) QUARTER REPEATING OPEN FACED KEY WIND WATCH

Notes:

1

Arthur G Grimwade, ‘London Goldsmiths 1697-1837’, London, 1990. page 603 and mark no.1970.

John Mulford | British Museum www.britishmuseum.org › term › BIOG168166

Also known as John Mulford primary name: Mulford, John Details individual; goldsmith/metalworker; English; Male Other dates 1716-unrecorded (active feom circa 1716) Biography Romano-script capital M in square/double lobed punch. Goldsmith working in London. No record of Freedom. First mark entered as smallworker ‘for gold’ on 14th November 1716 (Grimwade no. 1970). Second mark was entered on 5th May 1725 (Grimwade no. 1509) for Sterling standard. No further details known and date of death unrecorded. Bibliography Arthur G Grimwade, ‘London Goldsmiths 1697-1837’, London, 1990. page 603 and mark no.1970.

Mulford Goldsmiths mark

2

http://www.weekehistory.co.uk/weeke/trans/baughurst.htm

Rev William WOODWARD, Thomas and Alice GROVE, and John and Ann MULFORD are buried Baughurst church – as are other family members not shown above [+ baptisms].

3

John MULFORD’s local home:

See TADS transcription of will.

His 1814 will describes his accommodation thus:

of the late John WHITBURN, David GUNTER his grandson £100 each

I give John GUNTER now living with me the copyhold estate I live in and occupy with which I bought of John PALY[?] with all the fixtures …

4

he has owned the Change was owing to the Cold Water you threw upon ’em by telling him he Shod. be dipped every Morning in Mr. Mulford’s P〈ond〉 of Water—which he took such particular

5

Description: Will of Thomas Grove, Mercer of Andover, Hampshire Date: 26 March 1750 Held by: The National Archives, Kew

6

Basingstoke chapels, and at ‘Mortimer late Common’

7

An obituary link:

The Universal Magazine of Knowledge and Pleasure books.google.co.uk › books

8

Correspondence ….

New Cases of practice with Perkins’s … Metallic Tractors, … books.google.co.uk › books

9

10

Illegitimate daughter

CR 17/11/2020

24 January 2021

Hi, Steve

It’s interesting to read about your new William Howes link as the latter’s story continues to defeat me and One Name Studies, a site of which I can see Steve is aware:

Martha Howes b. 20 Feb 1751/52 Fleet Street, City of London … https://howesfamilies.com › getperson

The seven thousand pounds New South Sea Annuity I have standing in my name I give to my cousin John Howes and George Frederick Herbst his brother-in-law .

The above site holds much information on William Howes and his issue but no details of his birth or first marriage.

William Howes was a goldsmith and clockmaker of Temple Gate who had been apprenticed to John Mulford senior at the London Clockmakers Company from 1721 [along with son John and George Simpson, another of John Mulford’s “cousins”].

http://www.clockmakers.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/CCMASTERSFINAL-amended-

Clockmakers’ Company Masters and their Apprentices. Transcribed from Atkins’ list of 1931. Master. Trade/Co. Apprentice. Bound. Freed.

‘Our’ John Mulford’s will refers to his three “cousins”, William Howes’ issue

1

Name: Elizabeth Howes Event Type: Christening Event Date: 17 Feb 1734 Event Place: London St Dunstan in the West, Middlesex, England Event Place (Original): St Dunstan in The West, London, England Gender: Female Birth Date: 16 Feb 1734 Father’s Name: William Howes

Mother’s Name: Mary

2

e.g.

John Howes (painter) – Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org › wiki › John_Howes_(painter)

John Howes (9 November 1750 – 17 December 1833) was an English painter and miniaturist notable for his work David Garrick unveiling a herm of Shakespeare and the Ephesian Diana and for two paintings inspired by Thomson’s The Seasons Palemon and Lavinia in a Landscape and Celadon and Lavinia in a Landscape.

John Howes | Artist | Royal Academy of Arts https://www.royalacademy.org.uk › art-artists › name

etc, and

3

Name: Martha Howes Event Type: Christening Event Date: 27 Feb 1751 Event Place: London St Dunstan in the West, Middlesex, England Event Place (Original): St Dunstan-In-The-West, London, England Gender: Female Birth Date: 12 Feb 1751 Father’s Name: William Howes

Mother’s Name: Margaret Howes

their childhood home being in the Fleet Street vicinity.

Martha married George Frederick HERBST, jeweller of Cooks Court, London, an executor of John Mulford’s will.

Reference: PROB 11/1684/254 Description: Will of George Frederic Herbst, Gentleman of Turnham Green , Middlesex Date: 22 April 1824

Parish records[edit]

There are three Gunter family members in Tadley Graveyard. David Gunter lived with Mulford

Surname First Name Date of burial Age at death Parish record

Gunter George 1919-04-22 79 PR13.44.348

Gunter Jane 1838-05-20 41 PR12.2.255

Gunter David 1866-02-27 73 PR12.4.600

 

 

 

References

  1. ↑  Around Tadley People and Places ISBN 0 953704327 Published by Tadley & District History Society, Tadley, Hampshire, United Kingdom, 2001
  2.  Around Tadley Fact and Fable ISBN 10: 0953704300 /ISBN 13: 9780953704309 Published by Tadley & District History Society, Tadley, Hampshire, United Kingdom, 1999
  3.  Bogust , Bagganhyrst or Baughurst……. a history An account of the past in the Civil Parish of Baughurst comprising Wolverton and Ewhurst – and some adjoining area by STAN TERRETT MA (Rural History) with the assistance of local inhabitants.
  4.  Caroline Rodgers
  5.  Reading Observer – Saturday 15 June 1907
  6.  Star (London) – Saturday 13 February 1802
  7.  Morning Chronicle – Wednesday 02 February 1814
  8.  https://www.basingstokegazette.co.uk/news/17395454.the-origins-of-basingstoke-and-deane-road-names/
  9.  Enclosure Document 1850 Page 47 Map B 509 – 514 Map A 707 – 708 / 715
  10.  VCH Explore VCH Explore Explore England’s Past
  11.  The New Monthly Magazine, Volume 1From <https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=XjQaAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA98&lpg=PA98&dq=john+mulford+tadley&source=bl&ots=0aLzaX_iEi&sig=ACfU3U1Ht5zwqhoZkyZzKnrTCG7n6sBJIw&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwilkd3q_J3oAhUpShUIHe3_DlAQ6AEwBHoECAYQAQ#v=onepage&q=john%20mulford%20tadley&f=false>
  12.  An Itinerary by Mr J. R. Ellaway – Six weeks after Mulford’s death
Share to social media